If you are a Kathy Bates fan, that may be enough to keep you in your seat during the various shades of bedpans, bedsores and murderous impulses.

DOLORES CLAIBORNE

A Illusion review by Joan Ellis.


"Dolores Claiborne" is Kathy Bates all the way. Her eccentricity is the sole leavening ingredient in an otherwise grim recital of 22 years of life as caretaker to a nasty old woman in an isolated Maine village. If that isn't bleak enough, she goes home at night to a dreary marriage. Bates grabs the role of Dolores and shakes it until every fleck of her flinty stoicism screams from the screen.

The film's focus is the reconciliation between Dolores and her daughter Selena (Jennifer Jason Leigh), who returns to Maine as a self-absorbed New York alcoholic. Whence came the damage is the question we are supposed to care about, but Leigh plays Selena with such unrelieved grimness that it's hard to root for her.

If you are a Kathy Bates fan, that may be enough to keep you in your seat during the various shades of bedpans, bedsores, and murderous impulses. Come to think of it, even that's not enough. Too grim, no lift.


Film Critic : JOAN ELLIS
Word Count : 171
Studio : Columbia
Rating : R
Running Time: 2h11m


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