The movie is massive, sentimental overkill, but it's also a no-lose deal for everyone between three and ten as well for big people who want to believe that an angel is waiting at their shoulders to offer an assist in a tough situation.

ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD

A Illusion review by Joan Ellis.


Disney has served up one of each of the things it does best for this summer's younger movie fans and the grownups who love to accompany them. "Angels in the Outfield" is an unashamed lunge for your heartstrings, while "The Lion King" is an invitation to watch the extraordinary marriage of computer graphics with human animation.

"Angels" bounces itself off the surefire subjects of redemption, parentless children and snatching victory from the ashes of defeat. Roger, a young baseball fan, concocts the dream that his dad will come home to him if his California Angels can win the pennant. Since the Angels are cellar-bound and dad is a dark and dreary loser who rides his motorcycle with a cigarette dangling from his lip, the possibility of either dream coming true is close to zilch.

But Roger prays, and the real angels hear him. Flying in throughout the season at critical moments, they steam a pitch, abort a homer and supply the general sizzle needed to bring the moribund team to life. Coach George Knox (Danny Glover) is nasty in the early scenes - all the better for his later redemption.

Roger and his very cute sidekick run their operation from the home of their warmly wise foster mother, Maggie (Brenda Fricker). Watch for another standout performance by Fricker, who manages to seem very real in the midst of all this emotional manipulation. The movie is massive, sentimental overkill, but it's also a no-lose deal for everyone between three and ten as well for big people who want to believe that an angel is waiting at their shoulders to offer an assist in a tough situation.


Film Critic: JOAN ELLIS
Word Count: 276
Studio: Disney
Rating: G 1h27m


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